Newsletter

Home  /  Newsletter

Vercie Lark, left, Region 7 Great Plains Administrator and Ted James, right, Region 6 South Central Administrator, U.S. Small Business Administration  By Vercie Lark and Ted James Being black and walking away from a person who legally owned you became reality on June 17, 1865, when Texas became the last state to implement the Emancipation Proclamation. The day, now known as Juneteenth, has become one of celebration for black Americans.  It was a start. As black Americans, however, we continually must ask the question: “Are we truly emancipated?”   While important to celebrate a

by Ennis Leon Jacobs, Jr I recently wrote an opinion editorial titled “America’s True Critical Race Theory” in response to the political debate in Florida on this civic controversy. I had ulterior motives because my son is deeply immersed in the topic, and a friend, who is a state leader, was deeply moved by the Florida legislative proposals. The article recalled an experience in high school when, during a band trip, I and a classmate were ushered out of the home of a host student because of our

Whether working in academia, a municipal, state or federal department or within Corporate America, Black employees contributing to their retirement plans have one thing in common: their retirement assets are managed almost entirely by people who look nothing like them. And this longstanding dynamic is draining wealth from Black communities. The asset management industry, one of the remaining bastions of the old boy network, is not only frighteningly non-diverse at the upper levels, but those professionals of color within the industry find themselves struggling to raise capital from

Zuri Anderson, Black Information Network A new study is highlighting how state-sanctioned discrimination has financially disenfranchised Black farmers for generations. Black farmers lost over $326 billion worth of land during the 20th century, according to research published Sunday (May 1) in the American Economic Association’s Papers and Proceedings journal, per Reuters. Researchers found that racial discrimination and violence permitted by state laws ultimately led to a steep decline in Black-owned acreage between 1922 and 1977. They reportedly analyzed U.S. Department of Agriculture census data to determine their findings. Land ownership can provide

The 2022 State of Tech Diversity report by the Kapor Center and the NAACP breaks down disparities across the tech industry, from K-12 and post-secondary academic institutions, to recruiting, hiring, retention, and VC funding. Today, the Kapor Center, a nonprofit addressing racial inequities in STEM education and the tech industry, in partnership with the NAACP, released their 2022 report titled State of Tech Diversity: The Black Tech Ecosystem. The report analyzes and synthesizes the latest data, demonstrating the continual exclusion of Black talent across the tech ecosystem, which represents a

By Cherranda Smith, Black Information Network In a landmark vote Friday (March 18), lawmakers in the House passed the CROWN Act, which prohibits race-based hair discrimination in the workplace, school, and more. The Creating a Respectful and Open World for Natural Hair Act passed in a 235-189 vote, with only 14 Republicans supporting the legislation. The bill failed last month after Democrats put the legislation on a fast-track vote typically used for pieces of legislation not considered controversial. Supporters of the bill have tirelessly argued that banning hair discrimination is necessary for Black people who are far too often

In an effort to dramatically boost the number of principals of color leading K-12 schools across the country, national nonprofit New Leaders is forming a first-of-its-kind partnership with distinguished historically Black institutions Morehouse College and Clark Atlanta University to launch the Aspiring Principals Fellowship. The Fellowship is an online principal certification and master’s degree program designed to train the next generation of equity-focused school leaders who better reflect the students they serve. Half of all students in K-12 public schools identify as people of color, while only 1

As internet usage has become a routine activity, so has the mining, analyzing and monetizing of personal information – much of it done without the individuals’ knowledge. According to a Gallup poll, two-thirds of employees in white-collar jobs work from home at least part of the time, meaning there is more activity and personal data in cyberspace than at any other time in history. Unsurprisingly, the cybersecurity industry has exploded. ResearchAndMarkets.com valued the global cybersecurity market at $183.34 billion in 2020 and predicts it will reach $539.78 billion

Here's yet another history lesson they didn't teach in school, and it's right in time for the end of Black History Month and the start of Women's Month. On Monday (February 28) the US House of Representatives voted 422-0 to award the only all-Black, all-female military unit that served in Europe during World War II the Congressional Gold Medal. The 6888th Central Postal Battalion is credited with solving an urgent mail crisis in England when they arrived in Europe. The 855-membered group has for decades gone without proper recognition, but in recent years that has changed. In

By Megan Kirk The ever-growing racial wealth gap leaves little room for savings. As African Americans earn roughly 30 percent less than their white counterparts, putting away money for a rainy day can prove to be difficult. As African Americans age, financial stability becomes a major concern. Planning for the golden years is essential to survival of older generations, yet African Americans are falling behind. According to a 2021 study from Investopedia, more than half of African American households have no retirement savings at all. On average, white Americans