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Hailing from a lineage of activists, Mr. Kermitt Waddell, Esq. has carved a remarkable legacy by embodying the philosophy that it Is not about “i ism” or “me ism,” but about “we-ism” and “us-ism.”  His unwavering commitment to community-driven progress and inclusivity has left an indelible mark on his hometown of Charlotte. As a proud graduate of Second Ward High School, where his own uncle held the esteemed position of being the final principal, and a graduate of North Carolina Central Law School, Waddell’s path has been

With more than 20 years’ experience in the field of diversity, equity, and inclusion, Ms. Kathryn M. Hall is the Corporate Vice President of Diversity and Inclusion for JACK Entertainment. Affectionately known as “Ms. Fix It,” Hall’s mission is to provide resources to those in need.  “I have the ability to change people’s lives in this role overnight,” she says.  In her role, Hall oversees workplace culture, team member engagement, community outreach, vendor relations, sponsorship requests, and more. “Diversity touches every aspect of our business,” she reflects. “It’s one

CLEVELAND  --  Who’s Who In Black Cleveland will return after a hiatus due to the pandemic with its 15th edition. For 20 years, Who’s Who In Black Cleveland has celebrated the excellence of African American industry professionals within the Cleveland community. The brand welcomes Dr. Charles Modlin as its foreword writer for the upcoming edition.   As the Medical Director of Inclusion, Diversity, and Equity at MetroHealth, Dr. Charles Modlin is known for his thought leadership, perspective, and vision on dimensional matters of diversity through the lens of a

Vercie Lark, left, Region 7 Great Plains Administrator and Ted James, right, Region 6 South Central Administrator, U.S. Small Business Administration  By Vercie Lark and Ted James Being black and walking away from a person who legally owned you became reality on June 17, 1865, when Texas became the last state to implement the Emancipation Proclamation. The day, now known as Juneteenth, has become one of celebration for black Americans.  It was a start. As black Americans, however, we continually must ask the question: “Are we truly emancipated?”   While important to celebrate a

The failure of Congress to pass legislation like the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act and the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act have frustrated African Americans. With new voter suppression laws, the leaked Roe V. Wade opinion, and the assault on many other rights, some question whether the voting bloc that allowed Democrats to take the White House and control both houses of Congress will abandon the polls during the midterm elections. “Black voters are understandably frustrated with the lack of reform around voter rights, but the lack

by Ennis Leon Jacobs, Jr I recently wrote an opinion editorial titled “America’s True Critical Race Theory” in response to the political debate in Florida on this civic controversy. I had ulterior motives because my son is deeply immersed in the topic, and a friend, who is a state leader, was deeply moved by the Florida legislative proposals. The article recalled an experience in high school when, during a band trip, I and a classmate were ushered out of the home of a host student because of our

The Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) announced today that its Black Economic Development Fund (BEDF) has committed nearly half its capital, having closed on $122 million in investments for Black-owned banks and businesses throughout the country. The $250 million fund includes investments from Netflix, Paypal, Square, HubSpot, Aflac, Costco, Dicks Sporting Goods, ThermoFisher Scientific, Wayfair, McKinsey & Company, and Dupont. It aligns with LISC's larger Project 10X strategy to break down systemic racial barriers, including $1 billion in investments that support small businesses, community nonprofits, mission-driven lenders, anchor institutions and innovative urban and rural initiatives. "Over the last two years,

by  Aaliyah Bowden, The Charlotte Post The holidays are coming but some people won’t be in the mood to celebrate. After someone near and dear to you dies, it may be hard to enjoy end-of-the-year traditions. Holiday grief is when a person loses a relative or loved one near the holidays or certain festivities had special meaning to the deceased. “It’s a paradox because we’re there to celebrate but at the same time that the person is not there, it kind of dims that celebration,” said David Roundtree, owner and

Joshua Matthews, flight attendant, left, Kenny Jordan flies airplane during lesson, center, Kenny Jordan, right. By Megan Kirk The friendly skies have not always been so kind to Black people. Airports were largely segregated and many Blacks could not afford ticket fares. To make the distinction, though airlines were not legally segregated, airports actively practiced it and African Americans who did fly faced discrimination. Serving on the U.S. House of Representatives for Michigan, Charles Diggs Jr. helped to revolutionize segregation in national airports. It was not until 1948 when airports were legally desegregated

By Black Information Network There may be a hitch in your Thanksgiving plans this year, and it’s likely hitting your wallet. According to expert predictions, this year’s Thanksgiving meal may be the most expensive yet, with multiple forces to blame.The ripple effect of a backed up global supply chain has already had some Americans waiting months for furniture and leaving grocery store shelves bare, but experts say holiday meal costs go beyond the supply chain issues. The nation’s food supply has been impacted by the supply chain issues at the global level. The