Lifestyle

Home  /  Lifestyle

Whether working in academia, a municipal, state or federal department or within Corporate America, Black employees contributing to their retirement plans have one thing in common: their retirement assets are managed almost entirely by people who look nothing like them. And this longstanding dynamic is draining wealth from Black communities. The asset management industry, one of the remaining bastions of the old boy network, is not only frighteningly non-diverse at the upper levels, but those professionals of color within the industry find themselves struggling to raise capital from

COLUMBUS, Ohio, April 21, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Young Black Americans report that medical debt is impacting their financial health and nearly one in five Black millennials (19%) report that paying for health care is their biggest retirement stressor, according to a recent Nationwide Retirement Institute® survey. Black millennials report carrying substantially more medical debt compared to other generations. Of those respondents who could estimate their medical debt, Black millennials self-reported they have on average $11,469 in medical debt. That's four times higher than Black Gen Xers ($2,818) and ten times more than Black baby boomers ($1,111). The outsized medical

By Jovonne Ledet, Black Information Network In 2022, the gap between white and Black Americans is continuing to expand in all areas of life, according to this year’s Equality Index. The National Urban League released its annual report on the State of Black America on Tuesday (April 12) and the findings show widening disparities in wealth, education, health, civic engagement, and social justice. With little progress since its Equality Index launched in 2005, systemic racism continues to be at the root of the Black community's hardships in America. According to the report,

Results from Zillow's Consumer Housing Trends Report show renters of color typically submit more applications — and pay more in application fees — before they secure a place to live than white renters do. Renters of color also typically pay a higher security deposit when they move in.i The U.S. rental market is as competitive as it's been in decades, with the national vacancy rate lower than at any time since 1984.ii Rent prices have skyrocketed, up a record 17% in just the past year, prompting some priced-out renters to look for a more

By Cherranda Smith, Black Information Network Earlier this month, Lizzo teased online that she would be releasing the "biggest thing yet," and that it would be "bigger than anything I've ever done." Well, the wait is over. In an interview with The New York Times, the singer revealed that is releasing a shapewear line and that it is sure to shake up the industry.Her shapewear line, Yitty –– her childhood nickname –– will launch this week under Kate Hudson's Fabletics "active life wear brand." The first drop will include 100 pieces divided into three different

By Peyton Blakemore LaShun Pace has died at the age of 60. Larry Reid Live was the first outlet to report the famed gospel singer's death. "We have lost one of the baddest sopranos to ever walk this earth," read LRL's post on Facebook, which included several photos of Pace, on Monday (March 21). "LaShun Pace one of the lead singers of The Pace Sisters has passed." The statement continued, "The Pace Sisters recently loss [sic] their sister songbird Duranice Pace and Mom Pastor Betty Pace. Pray for them and all of us who will

By Cherranda Smith, Black Information Network Paris Mckenzie, a NYC-based 16-year-old, is making history in the hair and beauty industry, becoming the youngest Black owner of a beauty supply store. And she's just getting started. Mckenzie opened Paris Beauty Supplyz in the summer of 2020 after a space next to her mother's salon opened up. The young entrepreneur used her savings to lease the space and has since launched a salon of her own, La Eiffel Beauty Bar in Brooklyn.According to a news release, Paris is no stranger to hair and beauty, after spending plenty

As internet usage has become a routine activity, so has the mining, analyzing and monetizing of personal information – much of it done without the individuals’ knowledge. According to a Gallup poll, two-thirds of employees in white-collar jobs work from home at least part of the time, meaning there is more activity and personal data in cyberspace than at any other time in history. Unsurprisingly, the cybersecurity industry has exploded. ResearchAndMarkets.com valued the global cybersecurity market at $183.34 billion in 2020 and predicts it will reach $539.78 billion

Although the pandemic created many hurdles economically for all segments of the population, Black Americans were hit particularly hard. But many entrepreneurs have used the adversity to create the job or career of their dreams. We spoke with Andrus Washington, the CEO of Box Office Cookies, who turned his passion into a profession and profit. https://youtu.be/RfEx3-FNiqo

By Megan Kirk The ever-growing racial wealth gap leaves little room for savings. As African Americans earn roughly 30 percent less than their white counterparts, putting away money for a rainy day can prove to be difficult. As African Americans age, financial stability becomes a major concern. Planning for the golden years is essential to survival of older generations, yet African Americans are falling behind. According to a 2021 study from Investopedia, more than half of African American households have no retirement savings at all. On average, white Americans